What’s In A Name….

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I’m sure most of us have never stopped to think about where the neighborhood’s we live in got their name, or even the history behind it. While some of the older areas are named after Dutch settlers, the newer, more industrialized locations that have turned residential over the past couple of years received their moniker based on geographical location. Take the area of DUMBO, Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass. When we set out with our real estate agent, we might have chosen the location based on a number of factors, but chances are it’s not because of a name.

If we stop and think about it for a moment, there is a lot of history that helped shape not only the borough of Brooklyn, but each of the 77 neighborhoods that comprise Kings County. It’s extremely fascinating, especially if you’re a history buff.  The Brooklyn Historical Society is a great place for more in-depth knowledge on such a fascinating topic.

The borough itself has the Dutch colonists to thank for their name. In the mid 1600’s Brooklyn consisted of six separate towns. One of these towns, settled in 1646, was named “Breuckelen,” named after a village in the Netherlands. In 1664, the English gained control of the area and the name was eventually anglicized to “Brooklyn” the name residents have come to know and love.

As for the areas that comprise the borough, let’s take a look at where a few originated.

Gerritsen Beach

 Gerritsen Beach

Located just 13 miles from New York City on Brooklyn’s southern shore, this quaint and close knit community was named for the Dutch settler, Wolphert Gerretse, who built his home and mill alongside Gerritsen Creek in the early 17th century. The area was mainly rural territory until the 1920’s when developers began building a resort community.

The allure of Gerritsen Beach for many multi-generational families is living amongst friends and the security of knowing your neighbors. While close to Marine Park and Sheepshead Bay, the neighborhood has a private beach which offers easy access to boating and parkland.

Neighborhood stores and commercial activity can be found along Gerritsen Avenue. Another interesting fact, the neighborhood is home to the only remaining volunteer fire department in Brooklyn and is one of nine that exist in NYC.

Benson

Bensonhurst

Tucked between a multitude of neighborhoods on the southwestern side of Brooklyn, Bensonhurst was an area comprised of farmland back in the 1800’s. Originally owned by the Polhemus family, a landowning clan, they sold their acreage to the Benson family, descendants from some of America’s earliest Dutch settlers.

In 1889, a developer by the name of James Lynch bought the Benson family’s land; his plan was to turn the area into an exclusive resort, complete with a steam rail and trolley access. The Benson family agreed to the sale under one condition; that it would be known by their surname. For a brief time the neighborhood was referred to as Bensonhurst-by-the-Sea but over time it was eventually shortened.

Today, two main thoroughfares run through this popular neighborhood. Whether walking or driving along 18th Avenue you’ll find the streets lined with predominantly small, family-owned businesses; plus it is home to the popular 18th Avenue Feast which takes place yearly in late August/early September. There is also the ever popular 86th Street, filled with a slew of stores and restaurants. On the second Sunday after Memorial the annual 86th Street Festival is held and there you’ll find the streets lined with live music, food, carnival rides.

Carroll Gardens

Carroll Gardens

The residential area known as Carroll Gardens offers its residents a serene neighborhood filled with brownstone row houses, accompanied by beautiful front gardens. The area takes it name from Carroll Park which is a vital center of the community. The park, built in the late 1840’s, is comprised of playgrounds, walkways, and sitting areas that run between Court, Smith, Carroll, and President Streets.

Originally a private garden purchased by the city in 1853, it was named after Charles Carroll, a wealthy Maryland planter, who was also the first United States Senator for Maryland, and one of the signors of the Declaration of Independence.

You might be wondering why a man from Maryland had the honor of a NY neighborhood being named after him; Carroll led the 1st Maryland Regiment, a group of soldiers who were integral to the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776. These brave men charged the enemy holed up at the Old Stone House at the Gowanus so Washington’s army would have time to escape. Their bravery changed the course of the Revolutionary War.

The gardens refer to the big gardens in the front yards of these beautiful homes. In 1846, a surveyor named Richard Butt planned gardens in front of the brownstone homes in the oldest section of the neighborhood when he developed it.

Originally considered to be a part of the Red Hook neighborhood, Carroll Gardens began to have its own identity in the 1960s.

A favorite area amongst many, the neighborhood is filled with local retailers, cafes, restaurants, and trendy bars, giving it a distinct and unique charm.

Greenpoint landing

Greenpoint

With views of the Manhattan skyline, Greenpoint is one of the more cozier and intimate areas of the borough even as they continue to grow in popularity amongst home buyers.

Originally an area of vast farmland, it was surrounded by blooming trees, beautiful meadows, fresh water creeks and briny marshes. European settlers originally referred to a small bluff of land jutting into the East River at what is now the westernmost end of Freeman Street as “Greenpoint” but eventually the name came to encompass the whole area.

Because it was once predominantly farmland, many of the farm owners family names, like  Meserole and Calyer, are still the street names of today.  It’s also been said that Brooklyn’s distinctive accent originates from Greenpoint.

The neighborhood is also home to McCarren Park which first opened in 1906 under the name Greenpoint Park and renamed two years later after State Senator Patrick H. McCarren. The park contains an outdoor pool, a recreational center, film and concerts in the summer months, and a greenmarket which is open for business on Saturdays. The neighborhood is also a popular filming location for TV and film.

Over the years the demand for housing has skyrocketed and many new developments have begun [although completion is a few years away], especially along the area’s waterfront, which along with the waterfront in Williamsburg, was rezoned in 2005 for increased residential projects.

In 2015, construction began on Greenpoint Landing, a project which includes ten residential towers, a public elementary and middle school, and 4 acres of parkland. While as of this past spring one building has opened, completion is expected to be before 2027.

 

 

Brooklyn Hikes to Fall For

Time to take a hike! It’s a new season, and the perfect temperature to get out and about. There are some wonderfall places to hike and leaf-peep, right in your very own Brooklyn backyard! Here are some hikes you’re sure to like.

 

57e43ecc90fb2Marsh March
Fantastic fauna features in Marine Park’s Salt Marsh Nature Trail, also known as the Gerritsen Creek Nature Trail. Considered an easy to moderate hike, the path is about a mile long and follows the shore of Gerritsen Creek, which empties into Jamaica Bay. The trail takes hikers through a prairie of tall grass and a restoration project was recently completed in the area, clearing it of invasive plant species, and allowing native flora to flourish. The boardwalk trail with viewing platform is a great spot to spy on fish and crabs, and is a haven for bird-watchers with egrets, herons, ducks and geese often frequenting the landscape. NYC’s Urban Park Rangers run free, guided hikes of the marsh throughout the year, with one coming up on Sunday, November 20.
Avenue U and East 33rd Street, Marine Park.

 

57e554d400b2eA Pleasurable Prospect
Boasting lovely lawns and a sixty acre lake, hiking in Prospect Park is so much more than a walk in the park. Numerous hiking trails wind throughout the park, including Prospect Park Trail which is an easy 3.25 mile hike that takes about 2 hours to complete, and is dog friendly (be sure to take your pup to the dog beach before it gets too chilly!). NYC Parks run several free organized hikes throughout the park, such as the Fall Foliage Walk on Saturday, October 22 . On this hike, Urban Park Ranger naturalists explain why leaves change colors, and introduce hikers to the diversity of trees found in our urban Brooklyn forests. On Black Friday, November 25, hikers of The Midwood Trail will be taken on a journey back in time, with a 30-minute walk through Brooklyn’s oldest remaining forest, filled with birds and other animals. Home to some of Prospect Park’s largest trees, The Midwood is a relic of Brooklyn’s history and was preserved and incorporated into the park during its original construction. Also worth checking out are the Lullwater, Peninsula and Waterfall trails.
101 East Drive, Prospect Park.

 

newtown_creek_nature_walk_4220-8l50pz3dtxwc4o0k0wg0wkk8s-c4xtg9uu3r404wggo4ss0ss8s-thTalk a Walk on the Waste Side
You’re not likely to see beautiful birds or wondrous woods on this walk, but it is closer to what one might imagine when they think of a New York City hike. Newtown Creek Nature Walk is a quarter-mile long public walkway along Newtown Creek in Greenpoint. Designed by environmental sculpture artist George Trakas and completed in 2007, the walk offers a taste of nature and beauty, next door to a sewage treatment plant, and amongst what some might describe as an industrial wasteland with a heavily polluted waterway. The trail affords visitors a truly unique view of Brooklyn’s settling tanks and digesters and educates them on wastewater treatment, the harbor’s water quality and the history of New York City. Open from dawn to dusk, the trail is a secret point of relaxation in the far north of Brooklyn, and features young trees, shrubbery, flowers and a Scavenger Hunt. Dotted with stone resting areas, tiled patios and drinking fountains, it is an unexpected place of beauty, tranquility and learning, amidst a history of environmental damage.
Paidge Ave & Provost St, Greenpoint.

 

Brilliant Botany21083897873_f84fdb2c78_b
A kaleidoscope of colors will greet Brooklyn Botanical Garden-goers this fall. Begin your exploration at the Native Flora Garden, a small forest of some of the oldest plants in the Garden, such as the 100-foot-tall, century-old sweet gum tree with deep crimson foliage. Be sure to visit the meadow in this Garden, and observe the colorful grasses, wildflowers and butterfly milkweed. Next, head to the Cranford Rose Garden and catch the second and final flush of blooms, which last into October and often, early November. Also in the Rose Garden keep an eye out for squirrels and mockingbirds – these little guys drop by to snack on the rose hips. Following this, walk over to the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden, which offers sweeping views of a landscape filled with maple trees in stunning shades of orange, red, yellow, and purple. The gorgeous Garden is open in October from 8am-6pm on Tuesday to Friday, and 10am-6pm on weekends. Kids under 12 get in for free and entry for adults is $12.
1000 Washington Avenue, Prospect Park.

In the Brooklyn Swim

We’ve just made it through the first heatwave of the year and the warm weather is set to continue! How are you going to beat the summer heat? Free outdoor pools of course!

 

red hookHook, Lane and Swimmer
80 years old and still going strong! The Red Hook Pool was a Federal Works Progress Administration (WPA) project that opened in 1939, deep in the Great Depression during a summer that broke local heat records. The opening of the immense outdoor pool was attended by 40,000 people. Today, the pool is popular but thankfully a lot less people are in attendance. The pool is open daily from 11am-7pm, with weekday lap hours for keen swimmers, 18 years and over, from 7-8:30am and 7pm-dusk. For lap-swimmers, on-site aquatic specialists are available to record your lengths and those with the most laps at the end of summer win prizes. Entry is free but you’ll need to register online or poolside prior to your session.
155 Bay Street.

 

Pop by the Pop-Upcarousel-large
It’s true what they say, good things don’t last forever. Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Pop-Up Pool is set to close at the end of next summer, after its fifth season and a highly successful run. The 30’ x 50’ Pop-Up Pool maxes out at an easy 3.5’ deep – making it just right for families with smaller kids. Entry is free and the pool also offers affordable swimming lessons. The area around the pool includes a 2,500-square-foot sandy beach, deck concessions, showers and restrooms. Open from June 29 til Labor Day, 10am to 6pm daily, for 45-minute sessions. The pool capacity is 60 and wristbands are required for each session, distributed first-come, first-served.
334 Furman Street.

 

mccarrenMega McCarren
Mini-pools are great for splashing around but if you’re serious about your swimming, you’ll want to go big or go home (hopefully to air conditioning). On the border of Williamsburg and Greenpoint, McCarren Park Pool is an Olympic-sized 329’ x 151’ x 4.6’ – that’s a generous 37,571 square foot swim area. Since 1939 (also a WPA project) the pool has been a cool haven and popular exercise venue for North Brooklyn dwellers, with plenty of poolside space for beach chairs and towel lounging post-swim. The pool is open daily from 11am-3pm, and 4pm-7pm, closing for an hour for pool cleaning. The pool usually draws major crowds so get in early.
776 Lorimer Street.

 

Double Fun at Double Dimage
Dip, dive and dog-paddle at the Douglass and DeGraw Pool in Gowanus, also known as the Double D. There are two separate pools here – an intermediate pool at 75’ x 60’ x 3’ and a wading pool perfect for the kiddies at 24’ x 24’ x 1’. The large concrete deck has a covered area and benches and is surprisingly uncrowded. The pool is also right next to the Thomas Greene Playground so if your little ones aren’t worn out after a splish and splash, take them to climb the monkey bars and scale mid-size towers. The pools are monitored by several lifeguards and open daily from 11am-7pm with a break for cleaning between 3-4pm, from July til Labor Day.
230 Douglass Street.

Events for Independence Play

The Fourth of July is fast upon us. On Monday we will celebrate the birth of US independence – you could say it was our very own Brookxit! If you’re celebrating in our brilliant borough, here are our recommendations.


brooklyn-bridge-park-fireworks-nycFire Up

For the 40th year, Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks will light up the sky over the East River. Bigger and better than ever, the annual sky spectacular will wow spectators across downtown Manhattan, Queens and Brooklyn. From around 9:20pm over 56,000 fireworks will burst forth at a rate of 2,200 per minute. For a good viewing spot you will have to get there early – so pack a picnic and make a day of it. Be prepared to stand or sit on the ground – no chairs or large items are allowed into viewing areas. Brooklyn Bridge Park will be the prime spot, followed by Brooklyn Heights Promenade, or you could head further north to Grand Ferry Park or East River State Park in Williamsburg, or Greenpoint’s WNYC Transmitter Park. Of course if you have any friends with rooftops in the area, now is the time to give them a call! As the highest point in Brooklyn, Sunset Park is also a great option.


Cone ZoneCapture

If battling the crowds to see the fireworks isn’t how you’d like to celebrate freedom then there will be plenty of festive-fun on the boardwalk down south at Coney Island. Ride the roller-coaster, play carnival games, enjoy some fried-fare, go swimming or relax on the beach. The now in its 100th year, the famous Nathan’s Annual Hot Dog Eating Competition will chomp-off at 10am. Will anyone beat Joey Chestnut’s world record of 69 franks and buns in 10 minutes? The Coney Island Fireworks kick-off at 9:30pm and while the pyrotechnics are much more low-key than Macy’s, the beach view more than makes up for it!


parkPark It

Can’t decide who gets your vote for best Independence Day activity? Well our presumptive nominee is Prospect Park! The Prospect Park Alliance has organized a day of free or inexpensive family-friendly activities. Celebrate the holiday with a ride on the Park’s beloved 1912 carousel, from 12-6pm ($2 per ride, $9 for a book of 5 tickets, free with Alliance Family Plus membership). From 1-4pm Lefferts Historic House will celebrate America’s birthday with reproductions of one of the greatest documents ever written, the Declaration of Independence. Make yourself a plumed hat to wear while signing your own “John Hancock” ($3 suggested donation). The Audubon Center will host a free day of nature exploration from 12-4pm with Discovery Packs, bird games and a Citizen Science project.


Cultural CelebrationCapture 2
It is important to remember that when the Declaration of Independence was signed, African-Americans were still slaves. The 45th Annual International African Arts Festival (IAFF) is a great opportunity to celebrate traditional and contemporary expression of various African cultural art forms. The four-day grassroots cultural festival is a fave of local African-American and Caribbean American Brooklynites. From 10am-9pm, Friday to Monday, Commodore Barry Park in Fort Greene will be transformed into an outdoor African cultural oasis with a Food Court, music and dance performances, a kids play zone, poetry show and more. What started in 1971 as a small vendor market has grown into an African Marketplace with over a hundred vendors offering one-of-a-kind, handcrafted original designs of merchandise ranging from jewelry, fashion, body products imported African fabric, artifacts, furniture, paintings and more. Entry is by suggested donation ($5).

BicyCOOL Paths in Brooklyn

May is Bike Month in NYC so it’s fitting to feature a few of the best bike paths in the borough, and with the weather finally heating it’s time to get riding!

 

041613_oceanpCarroll to Coney
We have an endless list of cool Brooklyn facts, and we just discovered something to add! Did you know… the United States’ first ever bike path was created in Brooklyn in 1894 – Ocean Parkway! Although some of the Parkway was cleared in the 1970s to make room for the Prospect Expressway, there are still plenty of trees lining this path, which makes it a lovely, scenic ride from Prospect Park to Coney Island, and generally flat and easy-going. Starting in Carroll Gardens, be sure to do a quick tour of the charming historic brownstones, then hit the path from Ocean Parkway and East 8th Street in Kensington, all the way down to Surf Avenue in Coney Island.


River Rideimage

Views of Manhattan, tours through various neighborhoods, a leisurely ride through the park and a speedy ride through the streets – the Brooklyn Greenway is ride up our alley! Obviously we’re not a fan of a PATH unless it’s in Brooklyn, and this one happens to be one of the most impressive in the city, running along the East River from Greenpoint to Red Hook. Take in the views of the city skyline, and breathe in fresh air while cruising through Brooklyn Bridge Park (be aware that the path in the park can get crowded!). The six-mile path runs from Kent Avenue to the northern end of Van Brunt Street, with plans to extend it through Sunset Park to Bay Ridge. 

 

imageBuckle Up
You’re in for quite a ride on the Belt Parkway Bike Path! Starting from Bay Ridge this waterfront path has a spectacular view of the Staten Island, the Verrazano Bridge and the New York harbor. Pedaling along the coast and through Sheepshead Bay, with the open Atlantic Ocean beside you, you’ll eventually reach Flatbush Avenue. Here you can take a right and continue over the Marine Parkway Bridge, then turn left and head to Rockaway Beach. This is a smooth ride, several miles long with sensational views.


Bridge and Borough Biking91012pulaski

Pulaski and you shall receive! About a month ago the new, improved and much-anticipated Pulaski Bridge Bike Path officially opened, taking cyclists on a safe, scenic tour through three boroughs. Starting in Long Island City, the two-lane, protected bike lane, travels across the bridge, into North Brooklyn. Cycling through commercial Manhattan Avenue then residential Noble Street, you take Kent Avenue down to the Williamsburg Bridge, and then across into the Lower East Side. With stellar views of the Manhattan skyline and a solid workout guaranteed – it is highly bikely you’ll enjoy this one!

Make it to Market

One of our favorite things about Spring is the super fresh and delicious, seasonal produce, and luckily for us there are dozens of farmers markets in Brooklyn to choose from. The below are open right now, so do some research on the seasonal specialties, grab a tote and head to market!

 

greenpoint 2

A Green Point
Greenpoint never disappoints, with farmers markets held on Saturdays year-round in McCarren Park. These much-loved markets are enjoyed by the vibrant, growing Williamsburg community and the longtime Greenpoint Polish community. Shoppers mingle with friends and neighbors, bring their dogs to run around at McCarren Park and enjoy live music by local artists and cooking demonstrations by local chefs. Since 1997 this market has stayed true to its loyal customers who are encouraged to learn about featured produce and take home recipes.
North 12th St & Union Ave, Brooklyn. Saturdays, 8am-3pm (Year-Round).

 

PSL_CenterLaneSunny_May2014From the Earth, Down to Earth
On Sundays the Down to Earth Farmers Markets land in Park Slope. This is how we to like to start our Sunday mornings! Founded in 2004 the markets include dozens of vendors who sell plants, flowers, fruits, vegetables, eggs, dairy, honey, baked goods, meat, poultry and more. In the market for the freshest of fresh produce? Check the website to see what’s in season. Right now we’re sea’ing seafood and ciders! This weekend (5/15) there will be a textile recycling program from 10am-5pm. The Market is now also open on Wednesdays if you’re planning a mid-week grocery shop!
5th Ave between 3rd and 4th St, Park Slope. Sundays, 10am-5pm (4/24 – 12/18); Wednesdays, 3pm-7pm (5/11 – 11/16).

 

grand army plazaArmed and Delicious
Founded in 1989, the Grand Army Plaza market is appropriately named, and is the grandest and largest Brooklyn market in the Greenmarket program. On Saturdays year-round these markets treat market-goers to a huge array of farm-fresh produce. A mix of shoppers, runners, dog walkers, families, foodies and more from Park Slope, Prospect Heights, Crown Heights and beyond come together to enjoy the numerous stalls. If you’re checking these markets out, why not make a day of it and explore the nearby beautiful Prospect Park, Brooklyn Botanic Gardens, Brooklyn Public Library or Brooklyn Museum.
Prospect Park West & Flatbush Avenue, Northwest corner of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Saturdays, 8am-4pm (Year-Round).

 

courtelyouCourt-Sell-You
We’re sold on the Cortelyou Greenmarket, located on lively Courtelyou Road in Flatbush on Sundays. Since 2003 market-goers have filled their bags and baskets with specialty Mexican produce and herbs, eggs, chicken, fresh pasta, orchard fruit and juices, seafood, mushrooms, grass-fed beef, goat cheese and locally-grown vegetables. Is your mouth watering yet? Cooking demonstrations, seasonal celebrations, family-friendly activities like singalongs and the open adjacent schoolyard ensures a festive atmosphere, located among a thriving shopping strip in the heart of South Brooklyn.
Cortelyou Road between Argyle & Rugby, Flatbush. Sundays, 8am-3pm (Year-Round).

 

 

Make Mom’s Day

One of the most important days of the year… this Sunday is Mother’s Day! Take this opportunity to spoil mom and thank her for her eternal, unwavering love and support. Spend a memorable day together at one of these events taking place in Brooklyn.


BIANCO_Sigrid-Spinnox-29Bianco Under the Bridge
Marvel with mom in the magic of human balance and counter balance, delivered by the sophisticated circus troupe NoFit State. Performing arts institution St. Ann’s Warehouse welcomes the international circus and their spaceship-shaped tent to Brooklyn Bridge Park, as they make their North American debut this month with their show Bianco. Accompanied by a live band, NoFit State will perform exquisite displays of prowess and dare right above spectators’ heads, in a series of gorgeous aerial spectacles.
2pm-8:30pm, Sunday, May 8. Tickets from $35.

 

Mother of all Brunchesmeadowsweet
You’ll show mom your aplomb by taking her to a Michelin Star restaurant in Williamsburg for an unbeatable brunch. Meadowsweet serves Mediterranean-influenced New American dishes and craft cocktails in a casually cool, bright and airy setting with a bar. For $45 you will enjoy a cocktail or glass of wine, baked goods and a 2-course brunch choosing from mains like huevos rancheros, duck pastrami hash, three egg omelet, French toast and more. Reservations required.
11am-3pm, Sunday, May 8. $45 for adults.

 

BRIDGETake a Walk on the Brooklyn Side
Demonstrate the caring and supportive qualities mom instilled in you by participating in the 5th Annual Mother’s Day Walk across Brooklyn Bridge. The Mother’s Day Walk is a NYC tradition held by Milagros Day Worldwide, a nonprofit organization that empowers survivors of domestic violence. It is a fun family day that honors and celebrates motherhood while raising awareness and funds. The day starts with an hour of Zumba and opening ceremony in Manhattan, progresses across the Bridge and ends with a multicultural family festival at Cadman Plaza Park between Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn.
9am-3pm, Sunday, May 8. $10 + Booking Fee.

 

bklyndesignFine Design
Unfortunately it looks like Mother Nature might rain on mom’s parade this weekend, so here is a fantastic indoor option that beats the trip to IKEA backup plan. BKLYN DESIGNS is Brooklyn’s premier design event, showcasing emerging designers and established brands across furniture, lighting, tableware, art, textiles and jewelry. Founded by the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce in 2003, BKLYN DESIGNS will celebrate the borough’s creative community at Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint with collective exhibits, pop-up lounges, installations and hands-on demos. Check out the screen printing workshop (make mom a tote!) and get mom a gift at BKLYN BUYS, the show’s curated marketplace.
9am-6pm, Friday, May 6 – Sunday, May 8. $15.

MAYke a Run for it

It’s officially time to get out of hibernation, get up and get moving! Brooklyn has a bunch of great races all year round, but we’ve rounded up some of the best ones taking place next month. Ready… set… GO!

 

cambaThe Healthy Way or the Highway
If you need more incentive to hit the ground running, CAMBA’s Healthy Way 5k & 10k is for a great cause. This annual run/walk in Prospect Park is to raise funds to support the non-profit agency’s life-changing services for 45,000 New Yorkers in need. Participants can choose from a 5km run/walk or 10k run and receive a t-shirt and race day snacks!
Sunday, May 1. $30

 

dimeIn the St. Nick of Dime
Feel like taking a super speedy tour around some of the hippest Brooklyn streets? The Dime McCarren 5k race in Greenpoint and Williamsburg is a cool race that gets more and more popular each year! Awards will go to the first 3 male and female runners to the finish line and the top 3 finishers in each ten-year age group. Proceeds go to St. Nicks Alliance, a North Brooklyn nonprofit that seeks to transform lives through employment, education, housing and health care.
Saturday, May 7. $40

 

PTA-runRunning and Kidding Around
We all want the best education for our kids, and guess what? There’s a race for that! For the 9th year running the PTA 5km walk/stroll/run in Prospect Park will see hundreds of parents, teachers and students come together and raise funds to provide additional support for schools in need. Last year over 60 Brooklyn public schools participated and raised over $20,000. It’s a fantastic day for relationship building and for the community to work together on critical issues facing our public schools.
Saturday, May 7. $20.

 

sciA Race to Remember
Set on the rolling hills of Prospect Park, the third annual Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Awareness 5K will raise your heart rate but most importantly, funds! The run is a community effort by five of NYC’s leading SCI nonprofits who aim to maximize independence and the quality of life for people with SCI injuries, and their families. Traumatic spinal cord injuries occur approximately 30 times a day across the US and this is a great initiative to bring awareness to spinal cord injury and paralysis. Bagels, fresh fruit and spreads will be on hand for post-race refueling.
Sunday, May 22. $25

Second-Hand, First Choice!

We’re all about reusing, reclaiming and recycling and could get lost for hours in Brooklyn’s many amazing vintage stores. Here are a few of our faves!

 

bk reclamationThe Reclamation Location
Fourth generation Brooklyn brothers Ed and Rob founded Brooklyn Reclamation in Williamsburg after realizing the stuff their father used to collect wasn’t just junk after all! The store is full of reclaimed, neoclassical, primitive and industrial furnishings – everything from sleek, mid-century desk chairs to vintage model sailboats and old commercial signs. Happy hunting!
676 Driggs Avenue, Williamsburg. Monday-Sunday, 11am-7pm.

 

A Beckoning Beaconbeacons-closet-bushwick
The high-cost of living means it makes a lot of cents to buy second-hand! A Brooklyn-based, female-founded company, Beacon’s Closet embraces sustainability and ethical business practices. They have a vast vintage offering including upscale designer pieces, as well as modern fashion at bargain prices. Stock is based on people who bring in their used clothing to sell, which may or may not look something like this.
74 Guernsey St, Greenpoint. Monday-Sunday, 11am-8pm.
92 5th Ave, Park Slope. Monday-Sunday, 11am-8pm.
23 Bogart St, Bushwick. Monday-Sunday, 11am-8pm.

 


antoinetteAntique Boutique
We love scavenging for special one-in-a-million pieces that no one else will have. At Antoinette, you will find an eclectic blend of worn-in vintage perfection and modern items. Operating since May 2011 in South Williamsburg, owner Lexi Oliveri named the store after her mother. She incorporated pieces from her mother’s and other family members’ closets, and aims to make pieces affordable to those who have shopped vintage long before it was trendy to do so.
119 Grand Street, Williamsburg. Tuesday-Saturday, 12pm-7pm; Sunday, 12pm–6pm.

 


Stellar SellerStella-Dallas-Visit-17

A finely sourced emporium of well-organized and conveniently color-coded vintage wares, 10ft Single by Stella Dallas is a true star. Located in sprawling warehouse, you’ll find one of Brooklyn’s most extensive collections of ‘70s and ‘80s fashion, including vintage rock n roll tees and red-lined Levi’s. Next door, Stella Dallas Living aka textile heaven, has a superb selection of homewares and antiques including wool blankets, fabrics and antique Indian rugs.
281 and 285 North 6th St, Williamsburg. Monday-Friday, 12:30pm-7pm; Saturday and Sunday, 12:30pm–8pm.

Easter in the Brooklyn Burrow

Looking for some local fun family activities this Easter weekend? Leave the hunting up to us, and then your kids!

 

BKB-Easter-Egg-Hunt-2Eggstreme Egg Hunting

Do your little ones race like rabbits through the usual egg hunt and need more of a challenge? Brooklyn Boulders in Gowanus is hosting a vertical egg hunt for 4 to 12 year olds. Climbing cottontails will search high and low for eggs and can look forward to a bunch of raffles and prizes.
Saturday March 26, 10am – 12pm. $20 per child.

 

A Hop in the Parkimage

If you’re worried too much of the sweet stuff will result in hyperactive youngsters, then pack a picnic and head to the park. Prospect Park’s Audubon Center is running nature exploration activities where kids of all ages will learn about park animal winter survival tactics, how to identify birds and how to make their own tube of lip balm. Later Lefferts Historic House will host potato sack races, stilts, spoon races and more ($3 suggested donation).
Friday March 25 – Sunday March 27, 12 pm – 4 pm. Free.

 

mcgolrickPut All Your Eggs in this Basket

For a traditional egg hunt in Greenpoint, your chicks will love McGolrick! Kids up to 10 years old can bring a basket and participate in the finding frenzy or meet the Easter bunny and take part in arts and crafts activities. Babies and toddlers will roam in their own eggsclusive area, while older kids search for special eggs with prizes and raffle tickets inside.
Saturday March 26, 12pm. $15 per child, $20 at the door.

 

The Meadow is Always Greenergreen-meadow-farms-easter-bunny

A good time is in the basket this Easter weekend, at Green Meadow Farms at Aviator Sports and Events Center, located within Floyd Bennett Field on Jamaica Bay. The urban farm will host egg hunts, hay rides and pony rides. There will also be a giant hay wagon slide, a petting zoo and the opportunity to meet Whiskers the Bunny.
Thursday March 24 – Sunday March 27, $8 per child.