Labor Day in Brooklyn

Labor Day is fast approaching and while many people head out of town, there’s no place we’d rather be than Brooklyn. Labor Day was first observed in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, as a day to celebrate labor. It has come to be regarded as a day of rest and/or partying, and the last true day of summer.

 

imageJamaican Me Want To Party
Work hard, play hard, right? You will find no one partying harder in Brooklyn on Monday September 5th than the members of the West Indian Day Parade, also known as the Labor Day Carnival Parade. One of New York’s top summer attractions and biggest cultural festivals, the annual event will celebrate its 46th anniversary this year – drawing close to two million people to Crown Heights! Join the crowd waving flags from Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, Grenada, Haiti and other Caribbean and immerse yourself in rich Caribbean culture and heritage. The march starts at 11am and is a joyful expression of cultural pride. During the seven-hour carnival, steel-pan, calypso and reggae bands wearing elaborate costumes march down Eastern Parkway. Vendors sell home-style island grub along the route, with favorites like jerk chicken, Bajan fried flying fish, rice and beans, and johnnycakes. Admission to the carnival is free.
Eastern Parkway, Crown Heights.

 

Hair For a Good Timebeard
Did you start Movember six years ago and forget to stop? Think facial hair holds sexy secrets and not just leftover food? Here’s one for you… Coney Island’s 9th Annual Beard and Moustache Competition at Sideshows by the Seashore on Saturday September 3rd. Over the past eight years, hundreds of bearded men (and women!) have competed to take home the much-coveted Beard & Moustache Fez trophy. You will see the strangest and most extravagant beards and moustaches outside of Williamsburg, with the New York’s hairiest contestants competing in categories such as Best in Show, Worst in Show, Best Styled Moustache and Best Chops. The event is $20 for both participants and spectators. Doors open at 6pm and the main event kicks off at 8pm.
1208 Surf Avenue, Coney Island.

 

12417992_1077709758927003_6880316649301149185_nPoets and They Know it
If you partied a little too hard over summer and are ready to take it down a notch, check out this Brooklyn Heights event on Saturday September 3rd – Brownstone Poets. This group has been inspiring Brooklyn since 2005, encouraging poetry, fostering creativity and celebrating great talent. Brooklyn-born poet/collagist, Steve Dalanchinksy – winner of several awards and prizes – will present his work, along with Mike Jurkovic, whose poems and music criticisms are forthcoming globally and feature in various print media. Also performing will be poet and visual artist Yuko Otomo, who pens haiku, art criticisms and essays, and contributes regularly to a collective critical writing forum. The event starts at 2:30pm at Park Plaza Restaurant. Entry is a $5 donation, plus the cost of food and drink available on the night. Don’t be shy, there’s an open mic!
220 Cadman Plaza West near Clark St and Pineapple Walk, Brooklyn Heights.

 

Tempting TintypeCapture
If Labor Day is the worker’s holiday, there’s no better time to recognized skilled and hard-working individuals such as Julie Orlick. Julie will present her solo exhibition, Tintype Photography & Film, on Saturday September 5th between 7pm to 10pm at The Living Gallery in Bushwick. The evening of analogue experiences will feature up to twenty one of a kind wet plate collodion tintypes and five 16mm short films by Julie Orlick, a director, analogue/alternative photographer and 16mm surrealist filmmaker currently working and living in Brooklyn. The tintype work was hand processed, developed and shot in Brooklyn, featuring visual artists and “creative weirdos” that inhabit New York city’s art scene. The exclusive work featured in this show has not been released elsewhere and the selected films explore floral landscapes, in-camera edits, double exposures, the surreal experience, lust for love, confusion and wonder. $5 suggested entry.
1094 Broadway, Bushwick.

Cream of the Co-Ops

Do you want to know where your fruits and vegetables come from and how they’re grown? Be involved in a dynamic organization? Make new friends? Save some green on your greens? Then it’s time to check out food cooperatives, aka food distribution outlets operated by consumers. In Brooklyn, there are a number of co-ops that provide healthy food, promote economic and cultural diversity, and strengthen community bonds.

 

flFair Flatbush Fare
If only food was always this fresh, fair and fun! The Flatbush Food Co-op is committed to selling wholesome, organic goods, produced in fair and ethical working environments, with a focus on local foods, vegan and gluten-free products. Anyone can shop here, or join, with member-ownership $200 and no work requirement. Member-owners are involved in democratic participation and have access to monthly specials, discounted events, classes and more. The work environment strives to involve and empower employees and create a positive, respectful shopping environment, staffed with helpful and knowledgeable community members.
1415 Cortelyou Road. Monday to Sunday, 6am-midnight.


Sweet Slope Sustenancew
Members only! The Park Slope Food Coop may be a little more exclusive than others, but with over 16,500 members and 15,000+ carefully selected products, we think you’ll want to get involved! Membership is open to all, with a joining fee of $25, and members work once every four weeks in exchange for a 20-40% savings on groceries. The co-op was founded in 1973 by a group of committed neighbors who wanted to make healthy, affordable food available to everyone who wanted it. Working members receive good food at low prices, and have a say in the decision-making process and planning of the organization’s future.
782 Union Street. Monday to Friday, 8am-10pm. Saturday, 6am-10pm. Sunday, 6am-7:30pm.

 

bPick Bushwick
New kids on the block, the Bushwick Food Coop has been serving the community locally sourced and organic foods since 2012. Everyone in the community is welcome to shop at the member-owned coop grocery store, but members get the best deal – a 24% mark-up on wholesale pricing, versus 75% for non-members. Members pay a $50 membership fee and contribute four monthly hours. The co-op is democratically operated, and socially and environmentally responsible, striving to work with farms and businesses that are local, sustainable, fair-trade, organic and ethical. Grocery shopping never felt so good!
2 Porter Ave (The Loom). Monday to Sunday, 10am–8pm.


Greenest Grocerg
You will struggle to find a group of more dedicated members! The Greene Hill Co-Op in Clinton Hill is 100% member-owned-and-operated, only one of three such food co-ops in the ENTIRE country. This work model claims to keep prices low and food quality high. The co-op provides affordable, locally grown, organic food to members throughout the Clinton Hill, Fort Greene, Bed-Stuy, Crown Heights and Prospect Heights neighborhoods. The 1,300 member-owners invest $175 and contribute at least two and a half hours of work every four weeks. Sign up tomorrow at the Co-op’s open house and save $25 when you register!
18 Putnam Avenue. Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 3pm-9pm. Saturday & Sunday, 10am-6pm.

Make it to Market

One of our favorite things about Spring is the super fresh and delicious, seasonal produce, and luckily for us there are dozens of farmers markets in Brooklyn to choose from. The below are open right now, so do some research on the seasonal specialties, grab a tote and head to market!

 

greenpoint 2

A Green Point
Greenpoint never disappoints, with farmers markets held on Saturdays year-round in McCarren Park. These much-loved markets are enjoyed by the vibrant, growing Williamsburg community and the longtime Greenpoint Polish community. Shoppers mingle with friends and neighbors, bring their dogs to run around at McCarren Park and enjoy live music by local artists and cooking demonstrations by local chefs. Since 1997 this market has stayed true to its loyal customers who are encouraged to learn about featured produce and take home recipes.
North 12th St & Union Ave, Brooklyn. Saturdays, 8am-3pm (Year-Round).

 

PSL_CenterLaneSunny_May2014From the Earth, Down to Earth
On Sundays the Down to Earth Farmers Markets land in Park Slope. This is how we to like to start our Sunday mornings! Founded in 2004 the markets include dozens of vendors who sell plants, flowers, fruits, vegetables, eggs, dairy, honey, baked goods, meat, poultry and more. In the market for the freshest of fresh produce? Check the website to see what’s in season. Right now we’re sea’ing seafood and ciders! This weekend (5/15) there will be a textile recycling program from 10am-5pm. The Market is now also open on Wednesdays if you’re planning a mid-week grocery shop!
5th Ave between 3rd and 4th St, Park Slope. Sundays, 10am-5pm (4/24 – 12/18); Wednesdays, 3pm-7pm (5/11 – 11/16).

 

grand army plazaArmed and Delicious
Founded in 1989, the Grand Army Plaza market is appropriately named, and is the grandest and largest Brooklyn market in the Greenmarket program. On Saturdays year-round these markets treat market-goers to a huge array of farm-fresh produce. A mix of shoppers, runners, dog walkers, families, foodies and more from Park Slope, Prospect Heights, Crown Heights and beyond come together to enjoy the numerous stalls. If you’re checking these markets out, why not make a day of it and explore the nearby beautiful Prospect Park, Brooklyn Botanic Gardens, Brooklyn Public Library or Brooklyn Museum.
Prospect Park West & Flatbush Avenue, Northwest corner of Prospect Park, Brooklyn. Saturdays, 8am-4pm (Year-Round).

 

courtelyouCourt-Sell-You
We’re sold on the Cortelyou Greenmarket, located on lively Courtelyou Road in Flatbush on Sundays. Since 2003 market-goers have filled their bags and baskets with specialty Mexican produce and herbs, eggs, chicken, fresh pasta, orchard fruit and juices, seafood, mushrooms, grass-fed beef, goat cheese and locally-grown vegetables. Is your mouth watering yet? Cooking demonstrations, seasonal celebrations, family-friendly activities like singalongs and the open adjacent schoolyard ensures a festive atmosphere, located among a thriving shopping strip in the heart of South Brooklyn.
Cortelyou Road between Argyle & Rugby, Flatbush. Sundays, 8am-3pm (Year-Round).

 

 

And the Emmy Goes to … Booklyn

It’s easy to think of Manhattan as the solo borough when it comes to Hollywood fame. Don’t let yellow cabs and skyscrapers fool you. As we head into Emmy Awards season, we take a look at the TV shows that wear the Brooklyn badge with pride.

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Mozart in Bushwick

Fittingly hipster and counter-culture, Amazon Prime’s Mozart in the Jungle has roared onto Bushwick Avenue, between Montrose Avenue and Meanwhile Street. Just don’t make any comparisons to HBO’s Bushwick baby, Girls.

Commended for its darker deeper explorations into the twentysomethings’ world with a great breadth of older characters too, The New Yorker has commented, “There’s a silly montage of various musicians and their sexual styles; hot maestros are besieged by crowds of autograph hounds. Yet the silliness can be infectious.”

The show follows Hailey (Lola Kirke) as she hones in on her soul goal: to play oboe with the New York Symphony. Her love interest, Alex, studies ballet at Julliard and is played by Peter Vack – a huge fan of Brooklyn. He tells Interview magazine, “I live in Bushwick, my parents live in Williamsburg, and my sister lives in Crown Heights.”

Bushwick may be a no-brainer choice in the minds of many as since the early 2000s, it has gained a reputation as a neighborhood of artists, galleries and studies. A thriving dining scene has also paved the way for everything from family run taco shops to new boutique cafes. Roberta’s pizza has become a destination restaurant, and other popular spots include Bunna Cafe for Ethiopian food, Tchoup Shop for Cajun and creole, Momo Sushi Shack, and Arepera Guacuco Restaurant.

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Sherlock secrets in Brooklyn Heights

Elementary is a TV hit that stars Lucy Liu and Johnny Lee Miller as a modern take on the cases of Sherlock Holmes with the detective now living in New York City. The cine-magicians have audiences believing the home of Holmes is in Brooklyn Heights, however the exteriors are shot in Harlem with the interiors filmed in a studio in Long Island City.

Creator Rob Doherty tells the New York Post, “If you’re going to transplant Sherlock Holmes to an American city it has to be New York,” Doherty says. “There’s a texture to the place that’s reminiscent of London and both have Victorian elements.”

In the 21st century Holmes (Miller) is a recovering drug addict and former consultant to Scotland Yard, as he assists the New York City Police Department in solving crimes. He is accompanied by Dr. Joan Watson (Liu), who initially acts as his sober companion. She is a former surgeon and was hired by Sherlock’s father to help him in his rehabilitation. They eventually begin to work together on his cases, and she becomes Holmes’ apprentice.

Brooklyn Heights is one of the borough’s oldest neighborhoods whose Hollywood glamor dates back to The Cosby Show and Moonstruck. A true ageless beauty, Brooklyn Heights’ blocks of rowhouses, brownstones, former carriage houses and mansions make it a photogenic hot spot. The architectural variety includes 19th century Federal style, Greek Revival and Gothic Revival, and Italianate brownstones. It’s no surprise Brooklyn Heights was the first neighborhood included in New York’s Landmark Preservation Law. The Brooklyn Heights promenade offers breathtaking views of Manhattan, the Brooklyn Bridge and the harbor.

Stay tuned for more…