Luxurious Living in Brooklyn Heights

In the stunning suburb that lies a subway stop away from Manhattan, Brooklyn Heights is a neighborhood rich in history, legacy, and culture. It is one of the most desirable residential locations offering an abundance of things to see and do.

In addition to the numerous locally owned restaurants and shops, the famous Brooklyn Heights promenade puts you face to face with beautiful, unobstructed views. Whether you want a glimpse of downtown Manhattan which is directly across the east river, Governors Island and the Statue of Liberty to your left, or the Brooklyn Bridge and Manhattan to your right, it is the perfect place to take in these iconic sights.

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And along with the glorious, centuries-old brownstones found along tree-lined streets, there are historic landmarks, like the Brooklyn Historical Society, that lend to the old world charm this neighborhood has sustained throughout the years. There’s even a website that gives you a step-by-step guide to exploring the neighborhood on foot.

“The Heights” has also become a popular place to put down roots and for someone looking for luxurious condominium living there is no better place than the development known as 70 Henry Street [named after its location]. The gorgeous building is the brainchild of Mettle Property Group, Madison Estates’ sister company, and their partner JMH Development.

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Located in the heart of Brooklyn Heights, the building was once home to the former Brooklyn Heights Cinema, New York City’s oldest independently owned cinema on the corner of Henry and Orange Street.

A magnificent structure originally built in 1835, it housed a variety of businesses before becoming a movie theatre in 1970. Now, with the original façade still intact as represented by the exterior of the first two floors, it boasts a five-story residence ranging from 1500 square feet to 3500 square feet per condo [there are four, plus an elegant maisonette with its own private entrance] with all the bells and whistles one could want in such a gorgeous residence.

70_Henry_livingRoom_1207.jpgDesigned by world-renowned architect, Morris Adjmi, each of the residences has 9′ ceilings, 7″ wide plank oak flooring throughout, custom windows and kitchen with Thermador appliances, and spa-like bathrooms. No detail was spared when it came to the design and execution of creating such a grand living space while still retaining the building’s historic charm.

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“Together we combined the historical architecture with contemporary designs for a pristine result,” said Gerard Longo, President of Mettle Property Group. Mettle is a leader in the preservation of historic ground-up construction in context with their historic neighborhood.

Being a part of the community means becoming a part of this neighborhood’s history.

Ensuring Your Home against a Fire

Fire safety is something that you should be prepared for at all times of the year but as we get into the winter season, and some of the coldest months of the year, it’s important to be vigilant about protecting our families and our home.

Our home is filled with loved ones and personal belongings that often time carry a sentimental value so safeguarding what’s closest to us should start from the moment you move in. During the final walkthrough with your realtor, test and make sure the smoke alarms in the residence you’re about to close on are working.

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Owners of one-and two family residences must have installed in their home a working smoke detector that provides an audible alarm within each sleeping area. This sound provides an early warning to those sleeping that there is a fire and a greater chance of getting out of the home immediately. It is a requirement for every home in New York State.

Did you know that if a fire starts you have less than two minutes to get out safely? In such a short amount of time you have to be ready to spring into action and one of the ways to do so safely without wasting a moment is to already have a fire escape plan in place that has been practiced on a regular basis. Once you move into your new home, formulate that plan early on and make sure everyone is prepared in the event a fire breaks out.

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Escape Plan

  • Know two ways out of every room.
  • A closed door can stop the spread of gas, heat and smoke.
  • Have a meeting place outside your home.
  • Know how to call 9-1-1 from outside to report a fire.
  • Practice your escape plan with everyone who lives in your home at least twice a year

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While there are many different reasons why fires break out here are the top five:

  • Kitchen – Cooking is the number one cause of home fires. It takes only seconds for a pot or a pan to overheat and grease to splatter. Most kitchen fires start because people get distracted; never leave an open flame unattended.
  • Heating Equipment – Have your furnace checked annually and if your home has a fireplace, make sure to have the chimney cleaned and inspected. During the colder months many people use portable space heaters; these can be dangerous if used improperly. Keep them away from anything that can burn and never use them to dry clothes or shoes.
  • Smoking – If you must smoke, try and do it outside. Your bedroom should be off limits; how many times do you get drowsy, just lying in bed, watching TV. A lit or improperly extinguished cigarette is dangerous. And never put an ashtray on or near anything that will burn.
  • Electrical equipment – With all of the gadgets and electronics that are out there these days it’s easy to overload outlets with plugs; do not overuse extension cords. Also, be careful of do-it-yourself electrical projects. Sometimes it’s best to leave those in the hands of a professional electrician. And check to ensure your appliances do not have loose or frayed cords/plugs.
  • Candles – Who doesn’t love the smell of a scented candle! But they be dangerous if not used properly. Keep all candles on a level surface in a sturdy holder away from combustible materials and out of the reach of children and pets.

Remember… only working smoke detectors save lives.

  • TEST your smoke detectors at least once a month. Push the test button or blow smoke into the detector.
  • CLEAN your detectors at least once a year to remove dust.
  • REPLACE the battery every year. Better yet, twice a year – when you change your clocks in the spring and fall. Replace the smoke detector after 10 years.