Getting to Know Joe Baglio…..

Joe Baglio

While other young kids were dreaming of becoming superheroes when they grew up, Joe Baglio, Managing Partner of Madison Estates, was thinking real estate, even if he wasn’t quite sure at the time what that meant.  “I was drawn to the business at a very young age and intrigued by the process,” he says. “The thought of owning property was always attractive to me as well.”

A Brooklyn boy at heart, Baglio has seen the borough he’s called home since birth go through changes and believes it’s come a long way since he was a kid growing up. It’s a place where home values continue to rise, and the bottom line is, buyers are attracted to what Brooklyn has to offer.

We spent some time chatting with Baglio to learn more about what he believes makes the Brooklyn real estate market so attractive….

How do you spot an area that is on the rise before it truly explodes on the market?

Real estate is like a living, breathing organism; it has a pulse and you can just feel it. There are certain subtleties that you have to look for. I am a big fan of people watching, which will usually give an area away. And it’s a combination of the properties, architecture, and people that will indicate if an area is exploding or about to.

As the real estate market continues to prosper and we get closer to the New Year, what areas would you say in your opinion are currently in demand?

Right now I am very bullish on Prospect Lefferets Gardens; it’s an area I’ve spent a lot of time in and have witnessed its change right before my eyes. It has amazing architecture with many limestone and brownstone blocks as well as new, larger scale rental buildings that are fully amenitised which are attracting a younger, artistic demographic.

The original roots of the area are still strong which makes it even cooler. There are lots of restaurants on Franklin, Bedford, and Washington Avenue, plus you can walk to Prospect Park and the Brooklyn Museum.   

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As homebuyers, sometimes finding the perfect place takes longer than we hope. As a seasoned broker, what advice do you have for those potential buyers who walk through Madison’s door?

To always be honest and transparent with your broker. You’re trusting them to help in finding one of the greatest investments of your life. A good broker should know what your wish list vs your needs list is.

What types of changes do you see happening in 2018 for Brooklyn?

I believe Brooklyn has far to go with many areas on the South Shore that still have not been tapped, or should I say discovered. Growing up I remember the backlash I would get when I would tell someone I was from Brooklyn; at that time it wasn’t very chic to say that’s where you were from; it’s still sounds crazy to me when I think about that.

For newcomers, what would you recommend are the “must see and do” things?

You must tour the “Gold Coast”; start in Greenpoint and follow the coast all the way to Coney Island. The diversity, architecture, cultures, and sites will blow your mind!

When you’re not on the hunt for the next great property/location, what do you enjoy doing?

I truly enjoy spending time with my family. I am blessed with a beautiful wife and two beautiful children. My kids allow me to tune out the world and shut down my engines. I get to unwind and jump onto their level which is not all that difficult for me considering I’m a child at heart!

Your greatest passions?

My family and my work.

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What’s In A Name….

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I’m sure most of us have never stopped to think about where the neighborhood’s we live in got their name, or even the history behind it. While some of the older areas are named after Dutch settlers, the newer, more industrialized locations that have turned residential over the past couple of years received their moniker based on geographical location. Take the area of DUMBO, Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass. When we set out with our real estate agent, we might have chosen the location based on a number of factors, but chances are it’s not because of a name.

If we stop and think about it for a moment, there is a lot of history that helped shape not only the borough of Brooklyn, but each of the 77 neighborhoods that comprise Kings County. It’s extremely fascinating, especially if you’re a history buff.  The Brooklyn Historical Society is a great place for more in-depth knowledge on such a fascinating topic.

The borough itself has the Dutch colonists to thank for their name. In the mid 1600’s Brooklyn consisted of six separate towns. One of these towns, settled in 1646, was named “Breuckelen,” named after a village in the Netherlands. In 1664, the English gained control of the area and the name was eventually anglicized to “Brooklyn” the name residents have come to know and love.

As for the areas that comprise the borough, let’s take a look at where a few originated.

Gerritsen Beach

 Gerritsen Beach

Located just 13 miles from New York City on Brooklyn’s southern shore, this quaint and close knit community was named for the Dutch settler, Wolphert Gerretse, who built his home and mill alongside Gerritsen Creek in the early 17th century. The area was mainly rural territory until the 1920’s when developers began building a resort community.

The allure of Gerritsen Beach for many multi-generational families is living amongst friends and the security of knowing your neighbors. While close to Marine Park and Sheepshead Bay, the neighborhood has a private beach which offers easy access to boating and parkland.

Neighborhood stores and commercial activity can be found along Gerritsen Avenue. Another interesting fact, the neighborhood is home to the only remaining volunteer fire department in Brooklyn and is one of nine that exist in NYC.

Benson

Bensonhurst

Tucked between a multitude of neighborhoods on the southwestern side of Brooklyn, Bensonhurst was an area comprised of farmland back in the 1800’s. Originally owned by the Polhemus family, a landowning clan, they sold their acreage to the Benson family, descendants from some of America’s earliest Dutch settlers.

In 1889, a developer by the name of James Lynch bought the Benson family’s land; his plan was to turn the area into an exclusive resort, complete with a steam rail and trolley access. The Benson family agreed to the sale under one condition; that it would be known by their surname. For a brief time the neighborhood was referred to as Bensonhurst-by-the-Sea but over time it was eventually shortened.

Today, two main thoroughfares run through this popular neighborhood. Whether walking or driving along 18th Avenue you’ll find the streets lined with predominantly small, family-owned businesses; plus it is home to the popular 18th Avenue Feast which takes place yearly in late August/early September. There is also the ever popular 86th Street, filled with a slew of stores and restaurants. On the second Sunday after Memorial the annual 86th Street Festival is held and there you’ll find the streets lined with live music, food, carnival rides.

Carroll Gardens

Carroll Gardens

The residential area known as Carroll Gardens offers its residents a serene neighborhood filled with brownstone row houses, accompanied by beautiful front gardens. The area takes it name from Carroll Park which is a vital center of the community. The park, built in the late 1840’s, is comprised of playgrounds, walkways, and sitting areas that run between Court, Smith, Carroll, and President Streets.

Originally a private garden purchased by the city in 1853, it was named after Charles Carroll, a wealthy Maryland planter, who was also the first United States Senator for Maryland, and one of the signors of the Declaration of Independence.

You might be wondering why a man from Maryland had the honor of a NY neighborhood being named after him; Carroll led the 1st Maryland Regiment, a group of soldiers who were integral to the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776. These brave men charged the enemy holed up at the Old Stone House at the Gowanus so Washington’s army would have time to escape. Their bravery changed the course of the Revolutionary War.

The gardens refer to the big gardens in the front yards of these beautiful homes. In 1846, a surveyor named Richard Butt planned gardens in front of the brownstone homes in the oldest section of the neighborhood when he developed it.

Originally considered to be a part of the Red Hook neighborhood, Carroll Gardens began to have its own identity in the 1960s.

A favorite area amongst many, the neighborhood is filled with local retailers, cafes, restaurants, and trendy bars, giving it a distinct and unique charm.

Greenpoint landing

Greenpoint

With views of the Manhattan skyline, Greenpoint is one of the more cozier and intimate areas of the borough even as they continue to grow in popularity amongst home buyers.

Originally an area of vast farmland, it was surrounded by blooming trees, beautiful meadows, fresh water creeks and briny marshes. European settlers originally referred to a small bluff of land jutting into the East River at what is now the westernmost end of Freeman Street as “Greenpoint” but eventually the name came to encompass the whole area.

Because it was once predominantly farmland, many of the farm owners family names, like  Meserole and Calyer, are still the street names of today.  It’s also been said that Brooklyn’s distinctive accent originates from Greenpoint.

The neighborhood is also home to McCarren Park which first opened in 1906 under the name Greenpoint Park and renamed two years later after State Senator Patrick H. McCarren. The park contains an outdoor pool, a recreational center, film and concerts in the summer months, and a greenmarket which is open for business on Saturdays. The neighborhood is also a popular filming location for TV and film.

Over the years the demand for housing has skyrocketed and many new developments have begun [although completion is a few years away], especially along the area’s waterfront, which along with the waterfront in Williamsburg, was rezoned in 2005 for increased residential projects.

In 2015, construction began on Greenpoint Landing, a project which includes ten residential towers, a public elementary and middle school, and 4 acres of parkland. While as of this past spring one building has opened, completion is expected to be before 2027.

 

 

A Look at One of Brooklyn’s Historic Landmarks

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A borough so deeply ensconced in history, you’d be hard pressed to find a neighborhood in Brooklyn that doesn’t have something historical tied to it. Located within the area of Sunset Park, the Brooklyn Army Terminal (BAT), which is now a premiere real estate location for businesses, is another one of Brooklyn’s landmarks that is rich in history. Originally constructed as a means to dispatch supplies and personnel to military fronts around the world, the terminal has served in a variety of capacities throughout its lifetime. “The Brooklyn Army Terminal is such a remarkable place because it connected to so much of the infrastructure that makes New York City work,” says Andrew Gustafson, owner of Turnstile Tours.

The four-million square foot structure, which will celebrate its 100th birthday next year, spans from 58th street to 63rd street and from 2nd avenue all the way to the waterfront. Surrounded by water, it’s like its own industrial city. Remarkable in sight, the most dramatic feature is the atrium inside Building B.

“When you step inside the vast atrium, you get a sense of the sheer volume of materials that was moved through these enormouswarehouses, but what you don’t see is what’s behind the walls,” says Gustafson.

Before Renovations:

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After Renovations:

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At one time this was the hub for all of the military transportation operations of New York Harbor. Freight cars would pull into the building and unload supplies with a five ton moveable crane that traveled the atrium from endto end, spanning the length of three football fields and the zig zag balconies you see today were once loading docks. The area is currently closed to the public but regular tours are available for those interested in taking a step back in time.

Essential during WWII, over 20,000 military and civilian personnel were employed at the terminal and millions of servicemen passed through as they began their journey overseas. The most famous soldier to come through was Elvis Presley when he set sail on an 18-month tour of Germany in 1958. Photographers, reporters, and fans arrived in droves to catch a glimpse of the iconic singer.

In addition to being a major nerve center during the war, the Brooklyn Army terminal, which was once considered the world’s largest structure, served the city in a variety of other ways. During prohibition, it housed confiscated liquor from NYC speakeasies. What was once a thriving piece of real estate for the city unfortunately fell into a state of decay throughout the ‘60s and the ‘70s.  In 1981, NYC acquired the space from the federal government and a few years later a massive renovation was under way.

Since the days of old, the Brooklyn Army terminal has come a long way. Today, the massive space is home to a host of different types of businesses. Once filled with mostly warehouses and distribution centers, manufacturing companies are also taking up residency.

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Mario Macaluso, whose family restaurant, Pete’s Brooklyn Eats, has been a staple in the area for the last 28 years, and opened up a second location in the BAT six years ago. “It was complete tumbleweeds but we built it from the ground up, even adding an outdoor garden,” says Macaluso. Having delivered to the people at the terminal for years, the family had established relationships that proved helpful when space became available.  “After my brother, who runs the original location helped them out during the tragedy of 9/11, they came to us when the opportunity to bid on the space opened up,” he says.  It’s taken some time but Macaluso says this past year he’s begun to see changes. “There’s a lot of history here.”

Other businesses like Chocolatier Jacque Torres, a chocolate manufacturer, Uncommon Goods, an on-line boutique store, TechShop, a high-tech manufacturing hub, and the Intelligence Division of the NYC Police Department, all call this location home. It is also widely used for film and photo shoots.

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In 1965, the area, once referred to as South Brooklyn, took on the name of the neighborhood’s largest park which was built in the late 1800’s. Made up of 25 acres of beautiful elevated terrain, it’s a location that offers residents and tourists magnificent views of NYC landmarks like the Brooklyn Bridge, Statue of Liberty, and the Manhattan skyline.

The neighborhood is also home to NYC’s second largest Chinatown, with excellent restaurants and markets. In the mood for something a little different, stroll along Fifth Avenue and you’re guaranteed to find a multitude of restaurants that specialize in cuisine from almost every country in Latin America.

Reinvented through an increase in residents and strong business growth, Sunset Park is full of diversity and charm, making it an attractive place to call home.

Make Mom’s Day

One of the most important days of the year… this Sunday is Mother’s Day! Take this opportunity to spoil mom and thank her for her eternal, unwavering love and support. Spend a memorable day together at one of these events taking place in Brooklyn.


BIANCO_Sigrid-Spinnox-29Bianco Under the Bridge
Marvel with mom in the magic of human balance and counter balance, delivered by the sophisticated circus troupe NoFit State. Performing arts institution St. Ann’s Warehouse welcomes the international circus and their spaceship-shaped tent to Brooklyn Bridge Park, as they make their North American debut this month with their show Bianco. Accompanied by a live band, NoFit State will perform exquisite displays of prowess and dare right above spectators’ heads, in a series of gorgeous aerial spectacles.
2pm-8:30pm, Sunday, May 8. Tickets from $35.

 

Mother of all Brunchesmeadowsweet
You’ll show mom your aplomb by taking her to a Michelin Star restaurant in Williamsburg for an unbeatable brunch. Meadowsweet serves Mediterranean-influenced New American dishes and craft cocktails in a casually cool, bright and airy setting with a bar. For $45 you will enjoy a cocktail or glass of wine, baked goods and a 2-course brunch choosing from mains like huevos rancheros, duck pastrami hash, three egg omelet, French toast and more. Reservations required.
11am-3pm, Sunday, May 8. $45 for adults.

 

BRIDGETake a Walk on the Brooklyn Side
Demonstrate the caring and supportive qualities mom instilled in you by participating in the 5th Annual Mother’s Day Walk across Brooklyn Bridge. The Mother’s Day Walk is a NYC tradition held by Milagros Day Worldwide, a nonprofit organization that empowers survivors of domestic violence. It is a fun family day that honors and celebrates motherhood while raising awareness and funds. The day starts with an hour of Zumba and opening ceremony in Manhattan, progresses across the Bridge and ends with a multicultural family festival at Cadman Plaza Park between Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn.
9am-3pm, Sunday, May 8. $10 + Booking Fee.

 

bklyndesignFine Design
Unfortunately it looks like Mother Nature might rain on mom’s parade this weekend, so here is a fantastic indoor option that beats the trip to IKEA backup plan. BKLYN DESIGNS is Brooklyn’s premier design event, showcasing emerging designers and established brands across furniture, lighting, tableware, art, textiles and jewelry. Founded by the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce in 2003, BKLYN DESIGNS will celebrate the borough’s creative community at Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint with collective exhibits, pop-up lounges, installations and hands-on demos. Check out the screen printing workshop (make mom a tote!) and get mom a gift at BKLYN BUYS, the show’s curated marketplace.
9am-6pm, Friday, May 6 – Sunday, May 8. $15.

Summer Lovin’, Had Me a (FREE) Brooklyn Blast

We’ve rounded up the best free fun under the Brooklyn sun for you this summer, so you can save your pennies and put them towards your next winter coat… or endless iced coffees from the bodega!

yogaFree Yoga

You can’t put a price on good health, and you definitely can’t put a price on free yoga classes on Saturdays in Bed-Stuy! Every Saturday from now until the end of September, you can salute the sun and warrior away your worries, with instructor Katie Cercone leading classes at Jane Bailey Memorial Garden. Mats are provided and all levels of experience welcome.

SummerScreenss

Wednesdays in Williamsburg throughout July and August will deliver outdoor cinema at its finest. Get yourself down to McCarren Park for Brooklyn’s free film and concert series, now celebrating its 10th year. From 6pm there will be music, food and cult classics to watch like Jurassic Park, or you could become Dazed and Confused by all the Dirty Dancing taking place in this Wet Hot American Summer.

shakespeareShakespeare at Sunset

To be watching a Shakespeare production by the Brooklyn Heights waterfront, or not to be, that is the question. We think you will want to be there, watching ‘Measure for Measure’ as Brooklyn Bridge Park is transformed into Vienna, for a few nights in August. Now in it’s fifth year, the Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy will again treat us to performances from theater groups around NYC.

Bargemusicbarge2

‘They’ say the best things in life are free, and ‘they’ were probably talking about listening to classical music on a floating barge on the East River. Moored just under the Brooklyn Bridge at the Fulton Ferry Landing, Bargemusic presents “Music in Motion” on Saturdays from 4pm – a one-hour performance followed by a Q&A session with the musicians. Take in the lower Manhattan skyline while delighting in the exceptional acoustics provided by the intimate wood-panelled concert hall.